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The Cleveland Restoration Society, Cuyahoga County, and First Federal Lakewood partnered to expand the Heritage Home Purchase Program. The program, which began in South Euclid, offers assistance to potential homeowners in purchasing and rehabilitating houses built at least 50 years ago. Participants receive a home purchase loan, a home improvement loan, plus free technical assistance from the Restoration Society.

Four projects in Cleveland and one in Chagrin Falls received awards in the 10th round of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program. In Cleveland, the Fairmont Creamery redevelopment received a $3.12 million tax credit; the final phase of the St. Luke's Hospital redevelopment received a $506,600 tax credit; and residential conversions of two adjacent buildings on Huron Avenue in downtown Cleveland, the Starr Gennett Building and 1220 Huron, received tax credits of $422,001 and $3.55 million, respectively. The Spillway project in Chagrin Falls received a $1.65 million tax credit.

Developers have resumed the $50 million renovation of downtown Cleveland's Schofield Building. The 14-story building at East 9th Street and Euclid Avenue will become a 122-room Kimpton hotel and 55 luxury apartments. They expect to complete the project by the end of 2014.

For the third consecutive year, Preservation Ohio's list of the state's most endangered historic sites included the Warner and Swasey Observatory in East Cleveland.

The site plan for proposed retail development at West 117th Street and Clifton Boulevard in Cleveland's Edgewater neighborhood shows a suburban-style shopping strip and includes the demolition of the former Fifth Church of Christ Scientist. A neighborhood group is seeking "good urban design promoting a pedestrian-friendly plan well suited for a historic district" and the rehabilitation of the historic church.

Update: the Sun News looked at a previous attempt to redevelop the church.

Update 2: the neighborhood group offered a plan for a park on the church site. The plan calls for retaining the portico and demolishing the remainder of the building.

Plans for skywalks in downtown Cleveland remain controversial. Rock Ohio Caesars may purchase the Higbee Building in an effort to advance its plans to build a skywalk connecting the casino to its parking structure. Meanwhile, Cuyahoga County leaders plan to renovate an existing skywalk that would link the County's new headquarters building to a parking garage. A group of young professionals is urging County Council to demolish the skywalk and the City to reject the casino's plan. They a released video showing the negative impacts of skywalks in Detroit. A Plain Dealer editorial also encouraged County officials to remove the skywalk. The Atlantic Cities looked at the debate, and said that "it seems like a step backward in time."

Update: Rock Ohio Caesars will buy the Higbee Building for $79 million.

Update 2: on appeal, the National Park Service upheld its earlier rejection of the casino skywalk plans.

At a March 7 auction, Drury Hotels was the high bidder for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District headquarters building in downtown Cleveland. The $4.83 million bid was well below the anticipated $8.5 million price, but the school board voted 5-3 to accept the bid. The new hotel will offer about 180 rooms when it opens in 2015, and is one of a number of proposed downtown hotels. The School District may move its offices into the former Eaton headquarters building on Superior Avenue.

Five buildings in Cleveland and three historic districts in Cuyahoga County were recently added to the National Register of Historic Places. The new listings include the East Ohio Building, the Globe Machine and Stamping Company on West 76th Street, the Kendel Building at 210 Prospect Avenue, the former Record Rendezvous building at 300 Prospect Avenue, and the Herold Building at 310 Prospect Avenue. The new historic districts are the Baldwin-Wallace College North Campus Historic District in Berea, the John Carroll University North Quad Historic District in University Heights, and the West 25th Street-Detroit Avenue Historic District in Ohio City.

At its February 14 meeting, the Cleveland Landmarks Commission approved the demolition of the former Euclid Avenue Church of God at East 86th Street. The Commission had rejected earlier requests in 2011 and 2012. Meanwhile, the City of Cleveland is pursuing redevelopment plans at West 117th Street and Clifton Avenue that include the demolition of the former Fifth Church of Christ Scientist.

Update: the Cleveland Restoration Society's Perspectives newsletter includes an update on the Fifth Church of Christ Scientist.

Update 2: Fresh Water said that the Fifth Church of Christ Scientist likely will be demolished.

Sustainable Community Associates, developers of the East College Street Project in Oberlin, are preparing to redevelop the former Fairmont Creamery building in Tremont. They plan to convert the mostly-vacant 100,000-square-foot building into apartments, a fitness center, and offices.

Steven Litt visited the Butler-Nissen House in Cleveland Heights, the area's second passive house. It was built on the site of the demolished Walker and Weeks-designed James H. Foster house. He called it "a classic example of two positive values in conflict - preservation versus sustainability." Meanwhile, Fresh Water looked at life in a passive house.

Eight projects in Cuyahoga County were among the 23 recipients of tax credits (PDF) in the ninth round of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program. The awards included $5 million for the former East Ohio Building in downtown Cleveland, credits for six projects on Cleveland's near west side, and $3 million for the Beech Street Residence Halls Project in Berea.

Update: Cleveland's Department of Economic Development posted more details about the seven projects in Cleveland.

Citing the building as a safety hazard, the City of Cleveland razed the historic Stanley Block in downtown Cleveland. The City filed an emergency demolition declaration on December 18 and began demolition on December 22. A building contractor attempted to halt the demolition and the Cleveland Restoration Society asked the City to reconsider its decision, but their efforts to save the building were unsuccessful.

Cleveland State University razed Viking Hall and the Wolfe Music Building on Euclid Avenue to make way for the planned Center for Innovation in Health Professions. On Chester Avenue, The Langston saw its first tenants move in this past fall. The market-rate apartment project is scheduled to be completed in June. The University is also proceeding with plans to convert Mather Mansion to a boutique hotel, and reached a development agreement with the Chesler Group.

Lakewood officials are considering two requests concerning an Edgewater Drive mansion. Its owners have submitted a demolition request, while neighbors are seeking a historic landmark designation. The Lakewood Planning Commission determined that it's eligible to be named a landmark, but the owners hope to postpone a decision. In 2011, a developer proposed demolishing the mansion and building townhouses on the site, but eventually abandoned the plans. Meanwhile, a Cuyahoga County Common Pleas judge upheld the City's landmark designation of the former First Church of Christ, Scientist building.

Update: Lakewood's Architectural Board of Review delayed a decision on the demolition permit and the Planning Commission deferred a decision on the landmark designation.

A a retail strip at Clifton Boulevard and West 117th Street in Cleveland has been demolished for the Shoppes at Clifton, a proposed retail development. The project could include the demolition of the landmark former Fifth Church of Christ Scientist. Gordon Food Service plans to build a 15,000-square-foot GFS Marketplace store nearby, which would be in a cluster of grocers.

The National Park Service added four local properties to the National Register of Historic Places: Neal Terrace, Oppmann Terrace, and the former Richman Bros. factory in Cleveland, and the Euclid Heights Historic District in Cleveland Heights. The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board nominated an additional eight sites for inclusion, including John Carroll University's North Quad Historic District in University Heights and Baldwin Wallace University's North Campus Historic District in Berea. Meanwhile, the Cleveland Landmarks Commission recommended local historic designations for four east side properties.

After reaching a compromise with City officials and historic preservationists, the Cleveland City Planning Commission approved Cleveland State University's plans to demolish the Wolfe Music Building and Viking Hall. The mitigation agreement calls for the University to salvage elements of the Wolfe Music Building and establish a historic preservation certificate program. CSU and NEOMED plan to build the $45 million Center for Innovation in Health Professions on the site, and three competing architecture firms recently presented concepts for the new building. Steven Litt said that the institutions' design process is not likely to lead to an iconic structure.

Preservation Ohio's annual list of the state's most endangered properties includes two in Cuyahoga County: the Stanley Block in downtown Cleveland and the Warner & Swasey Observatory in East Cleveland. Both buildings also appeared on last year's list.

A couple purchased the historic Sears-Adams House in Chagrin Falls, saving it from potential demolition. They plan to renovate it as their home. The Greek Revival house was built in 1844. In May, Heritage Ohio identified it as one of the state's top preservation opportunities.

The former Ivex mill in Chagrin Falls was added to the National Register of Historic Places, listed as the Adams Bag Company Paper Mill and Sack Factory (PDF). It is being redeveloped as the mixed-use Spillway project.

Meanwhile, the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board recommended four Cuyahoga County sites for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places: the former Richman Bros. factory (PDF) on East 55th Street in Cleveland, the Neal Terrace and Oppmann Terrace (PDFs) apartments, both located on Detroit Avenue in Cleveland, and the Euclid Heights Historic District (PDF) in Cleveland Heights. It would be the City's 11th historic district.

Cleveland developer/architect Dick Pace spoke with Fresh Water about his role in renovating historic local properties for contemporary users.

For the second time, the Cleveland Landmarks Commission rejected a demolition request for the Euclid Avenue Church of God. The Cleveland Clinic has offered to purchase the property if the building is demolished. In Lakewood, the California-based owner of the former First Church of Christ, Scientist building is challenging the City's landmark designation of the property, filing an appeal in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court.

Experts from Cleveland and Akron participated on a recent Sound of Ideas program on WCPN, discussing the merits of demolition and historic preservation programs.

Steven Litt of the Plain Dealer said that the ongoing renovation of the former St. Luke's Hospital in Cleveland's Buckeye neighborhood "embodies a compassionate vision that combines historic preservation, strong contemporary architecture and urban design, high educational aspirations for Cleveland's children, affordable housing and an emphasis on mass transit." Joel Ratner of Neighborhood Progress Inc. described the project in the Cleveland Jewish News.

The Ohio Department of Development awarded $35.8 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits to 18 recipients. Two of the projects are in downtown Cleveland: a $1.6 million for a partial residential conversion of Rosetta Center (the former National City building at 629 Euclid Avenue), and $1.8 million for a mixed-use redevelopment of the vacant Truman Building at 1030 Euclid Avenue.

The future of downtown Cleveland's Stanley Block may be determined by the courts. Judge Pianka of Cleveland Housing Court issued $15,000 in daily fines on its owners, and one of the attorneys was arrested for failing to appear at a hearing in May. Common Pleas Judge John P. O'Donnell put the property in receivership. Businessman Tony George wants to redevelop the historic building as a restaurant, conference center, and meeting space.

More bicycling news:

Update: Councilman Tom Bullock of Lakewood explained the sharrow proposal.

The Lakewood Planning Commission designated the former First Church of Christ, Scientist building as a Lakewood landmark. It's the third building in the City to receive the landmark designation.

Local officials celebrated the reopening of the renovated Sylvia Apartments on Franklin Avenue in Cleveland's Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood. The $3 million project reconfigured the building, reducing its number of units from 24 to 18. The apartments will be mixed-income rentals.

The Plain Dealer's Steven Litt said that "it makes sense to explore" a proposed sale and possible hotel conversion of the Cleveland Board of Education Building, and that the building is a good candidate for adaptive reuse.

Judge Pianka of Cleveland Housing Court ordered Macron Investment Co., the partnership that owns the Stanley Block in downtown Cleveland, to either repair or demolish the historic building. In a related decision, a Cuyahoga County Common Pleas judge ruled in March that the ownership is evenly divided between the Maloof and Anter families and casino developer Rock Ohio Caesars.

The historic Stanley Block, one of downtown Cleveland's oldest buildings, remains under threat of demolition. Its fate may be determined at a Cleveland Housing Court trial on April 5.

The Shaker Farm Historic District in Cleveland Heights and the Jones Home Subdivisions Historic District in Cleveland were added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Update: Cleveland Heights Patch has more information about the new Shaker Farm Historic District.

Work continues on the Horseshoe Casino in the Higbee Building on Public Square. When it opens on May 14, it will be the first casino in Ohio. The owner of the nearby May Company Building recently proposed converting about half of the landmark building into a parking deck. The Downtown/Flats Design Review Committee voted to table the proposal, and the Cleveland City Planning Commission rejected the plans. Meanwhile, the historic Stanley Block remains in a state of disrepair and faces possible demolition.

Cleveland City Council approved a $1 million loan for the redevelopment of downtown's former Crowne Plaza hotel as a Westin hotel, and is considering a proposed walkway across East 6th Street to Public Auditorium. The Cleveland Restoration Society has "major concerns" about the proposal, because it would "obstruct the grand vista to Cleveland City Hall." Meanwhile, the developers renovating downtown's Schofield Building selected Kimpton Hotels for the hotel/residential project.

Cleveland officials said that the long-planned renovation of League Park will begin in late spring or early summer. The $5 million project will include restoring the ticket house and bleacher wall, and recreating the stadium's baseball diamond.

The Plain Dealer's Steven Litt analyzed the Cleveland Clinic's master plan for its main campus in Fairfax. The plan, prepared by Foster + Partners of London, calls for the creation of a green corridor through the center of the campus. The plan suggests redeveloping the former Cleveland Play House complex as an education center, but does not address the edges of the campus or the possible demolition of two historic churches.

The Ohio Department of Development awarded $14.9 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits for 13 rehabilitation projects. Eight of the projects are in Northeast Ohio, and four are in Cleveland. The Victory Building at Euclid Avenue and East 71st Street received a $4.38 million credit, the Park and Southworth Buildings on Public Square received a $1.98 million credit, the Rialto Theater on West 25th Street received a $484,108 credit, and the Gifford House on Prospect Avenue received a $108,914 credit. An Akron Beacon Journal editorial supports the tax credit program.

Cleveland State University's landmark Mather Mansion on Euclid Avenue could be converted to a boutique hotel. The university is seeking proposals from developers interested in renovating and operating the property.

The Cleveland Landmarks Commission designated Fenn Tower, Howe Mansion, and the Stager-Beckwith Mansion as Cleveland landmarks. The Commission will continue to discuss the proposed designation of the Wolfe's Music Store building.

State officials awarded more than $27.5 million in Clean Ohio Fund grants for 15 brownfield cleanup initiatives, including two local projects. Cuyahoga County received $2 million for demolition and remediation of Cleveland State University's Viking Hall and Wolfe's Music Store building. The university now plans to build a health and life sciences building on the site. The City of Cleveland received $2.99 million for infrastructure, demolition, and remediation in the Miceli Dairy expansion. The project broke ground in October.

Update: Cleveland Councilman Jeff Johnson wants to save the Wolfe's Music Store building.

Despite protests by residents, the Lakewood Planning Commission unanimously approved plans for a McDonald's restaurant on the current site of the closed Detroit Theater. The company plans to begin work immediately. City officials hope to install a traffic light at the intersection of Detroit and Woodward avenues.

Update: the Sun Post-Herald has more details.

The National Park Service endorsed the Ohio Historic Preservation Office's recommendation and said that a proposed elevated walkway to the casino in the Higbee Building would be "inconsistent with the historic character of the building." Rock Gaming said that it is evaluating its options.

Update: GreenCityBlueLake's Marc Lefkowitz considered what may come next.

Update 2: Rock Ohio Caesars is appealing the decision.

Cleveland Area History's Christopher Busta-Peck photographed the demolition of the Alhambra Apartments on Wade Park Avenue in Hough.

A traffic study conducted for the proposed McDonald's in Lakewood said that the restaurant would not have an adverse impact on traffic. Neighbors were not satisfied with the report's recommendations. The City's Planning Commission postponed its vote on the proposal to build the McDonald's on the site of the closed Detroit Theater.

The Cleveland Restoration Society's October newsletter provides updates the Cleveland Clinic's efforts to demolish the Euclid Avenue Church of God and the nearby Church of the Transfiguration, the recently-demolished St. Catherine Roman Catholic Church on East 93rd Street, and the sale of the Brooklyn Memorial United Methodist Church on Archwood Avenue in Brooklyn Centre.

The City of Lakewood published a draft of its historic preservation mission statement and goals. The concepts were developed at a workshop in August. A second community meeting will be held later this fall.

The vacant Moreland Theater on Buckeye Road (PDF) in Cleveland was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 15.

The Plain Dealer's Steven Litt was impressed by the renovated Tudor Arms Hotel on Carnegie Avenue in University Circle.

The Cleveland Play House opened its first show in the renovated Allen Theatre at Playhouse Square in Cleveland. The former 2,500-seat theater is being converted to three smaller theaters that will be used by the Play House and Cleveland State University. The 514-seat theater has reopened, the 314-seat Second Stage will open in January, and the 150-seat Lab Theatre will open in February. Fundraising for the project continues.

Last week, the Ohio Historic Preservation Office recommended against approval of a skywalk between the phase one casino in the Higbee Building and the casino parking facility currently under construction. Developers can build the skywalk if their request is denied, but could have to repay federal historic preservation tax credits.

The Lakewood Architectural Board of Review approved designs for a McDonald's restaurant on the site of the closed Detroit Theater. The City's Planning Commission may discuss the plans in October.

Update: Lakewood Patch has more information.

McDonald's is pursuing its proposal to build a restaurant on the current site of the closed Detroit Theater in Lakewood, and submitted plans to the City. The Lakewood Architectural Board of Review will discuss the proposal at its September 8 meeting.

The Chagrin Falls Historical Society may purchase Linden Hall, the sole remaining Windsor Hospital building. The building on East Summit Street otherwise may be demolished.

Update: developers of the Falls Walk subdivision withdrew their demolition request.

The City of Cleveland Heights soon may have a new district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The proposed Shaker Farm Historic District would be the tenth in the City.

Update: Cleveland Heights Patch has more information.

With the backing of Councilmen Johnson and Conwell, Cleveland City Council approved the creation of the Magnolia-Wade Park Historic District at its meeting today. Mt. Zion Congregational Church and members of a CWRU fraternity opposed the designation.

Renovations of the Allen Theatre at Playhouse Square are nearing completion. The theater is scheduled to reopen in one month.

The Ohio Department of Development awarded more than $23.8 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits to 13 projects, including three in Cleveland. The Middough Building received $4.8 million, the University Towers Apartments received $2 million, and the Joseph & Feiss Warehouse received $995,334.

Update: Crain's Cleveland Business says that the award could revive the Joseph & Feiss renovation project.

Cleveland Councilman Jeff Johnson has proposed designating the Magnolia-Wade Park Historic District as a local historic district. The area is already listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Mt. Zion Congregational Church, which wants to tear down two houses for an addition, opposes the proposal.

The City of Cleveland approved a rezoning for the historic Franklin Castle in Ohio City. An unidentified buyer intends to rehabilitate it as three residential units.

Cleveland State University intends to demolish its 13-story Viking Hall and the adjacent Walker and Weeks-designed Wolfe's Music Store building on Euclid Avenue. Cuyahoga County is applying for a $2 million Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund grant (PDF) for asbestos remediation and demolition, and will hold a public meeting (PDF) on September 8.

Update: the Plain Dealer described the proposal.

At a Lakewood Architectural Board of Review meeting, McDonald's representatives shared a conceptual site plan for a restaurant on the site of the closed Detroit Theater. Members of the board had several concerns about the design. The company is expected to formally present plans at the board's next meeting on August 11. Michael Gill said that board members will need courage as the process proceeds.

Preservation Ohio released its annual list of Ohio's Most Endangered Historic Sites. The 13 sites include the previously-revealed Columbia Building and Stanley Block in downtown Cleveland, as well as the Warner & Swasey Observatory in East Cleveland.

Update: demolition of the Columbia Building is underway.

The Cleveland Municipal School District continues to consider the possibility of auctioning off the Board of Education Building in downtown Cleveland and leasing office space elsewhere. The District is working with Weston Development to evaluate its options.

Representatives of McDonald's will present conceptual designs for a restaurant on the site of the closed Detroit Theater at a Lakewood Architectural Board of Review work session on July 14. A group of residents is trying to save the theater.

The two-year state budget signed by Governor Kasich includes an extension and expansion of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program, the new Innovation Fund intended to support local government restructuring efforts, and the option to pursue a lease of the Ohio Turnpike.

Update: the National Trust for Historic Preservation has more information about the tax credit renewal, and the Blade has more on the possible lease of the turnpike.

In late May, McDonald's informed the City of Lakewood that it was interested in building on the site of the closed Detroit Theater. More than 150 people attended a public forum on Wednesday evening, where City officials described the issues and the process. The residents in attendance overwhelmingly opposed demolition of the theater.

On Thursday, the Cleveland Landmarks Commission voted 4-3 to allow the demolition of the landmark Columbia Building in downtown Cleveland, despite organized opposition to the proposal. Rock Ohio Caesars intends to use its site as part of a casino welcome center and parking garage. The Landmarks Commission will not authorize razing the Columbia Building until the casino developers resolve their dispute with state officials. Richey Piiparinen of Rust Wire railed against the decision, while Marc Lefkowitz of GreenCityBlueLake placed it in a historical context.

Prior to the meeting, Cleveland City Council approved the sale of the Gateway North Garage to Rock Ohio Caesars. The National Trust for Historic Preservation presented its case for retaining the Columbia Building, Steven Litt of the Plain Dealer criticized the handling of an alternative concept, and Erick Trickey of Cleveland Magazine looked at the surrounding political circumstances. A Plain Dealer editorial said that the demolition is necessary.

The budget bills passed by the Ohio House and Senate include an extension of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program. Proponents of the program want the $25 million annual ceiling to be increased. A new study from Cleveland State University (PDF) says that the "program is producing a multitude of benefits across the state of Ohio."

At its meeting on Thursday morning, the Cleveland Landmarks Commission tabled the proposed demolition of the Columbia Building until its next meeting on June 9. Rock Ohio Caesars' proposal for a casino welcome center and parking garage includes the site of the Columbia Building.

Plans to demolish the former St. Paul Lutheran Church on Detroit Avenue in Lakewood for a CVS store are proceeding through the review process. Meanwhile, Michael Gill looked to Cleveland's Hessler Road and Collinwood neighborhoods for ideas about saving the closed Detroit Theater from possible demolition. Several construction projects are also planned for the West 117th Street corridor along the Cleveland-Lakewood border.

Preservation Ohio will release its annual list of Ohio's Most Endangered Historic Sites in June, but because of deliberations underway in Cleveland, revealed that downtown's Columbia Building and Stanley Block are on the list. The Cleveland Landmarks Commission is scheduled to discuss the proposed demolition of the Columbia Building on Thursday. Cleveland Area History shared more information about the history of the Columbia Building, Bill Barrow considered a historical parallel, and Ashley Shaw called the parking garage plans an "effort to cater to auto-centric suburban visitors rather than the residents of Cleveland."

Update: Marc Lefkowitz also criticized the proposal, and the Cleveland Coalition urged the Landmarks Commission to postpone demolition approval.

Citing "recent legislative action and discussion proposing significantly higher taxes and fees", Rock Ohio Caesars suspended construction of its casinos in Cleveland and Cincinnati. Matt Cullen of Rock Gaming said that there is too much economic uncertainty for construction to proceed. A Plain Dealer editorial supports the casino developers' stance.

Meanwhile, representatives of Rock Ohio Caesars presented the company's plans for a parking garage and welcome center to the Cleveland Landmarks Commission on Thursday. Their plans include the demolition of the landmark Columbia Building on Prospect Avenue. The neighboring Stanley Block was recently added to the National Register of Historic Places, and Heritage Ohio included the building in its annual Top Opportunities List.

Michael Gill is concerned that Lakewood may lose buildings that contribute to its architectural character. He considered the abandoned plans to demolish the Heideloff House and the proposals to raze the former St. Paul Lutheran Church and the closed Detroit Theater, which could be replaced with a CVS store and a McDonald's, respectively.

The two-year budget approved by the Ohio House on Thursday would indefinitely extend the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program, capping the annual allocation at $25 million. The Greater Cleveland Partnership supports the provision.

The latest designs from Rock Ohio Caesars for a parking garage and welcome center near the planned downtown Cleveland casino call for building around the Stanley Block and demolishing the Columbia Building. The company is also interested in purchasing the Gateway North Parking Garage from the City of Cleveland.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held on Friday for the redevelopment of the former St. Luke's Hospital in Cleveland. The project's $15.1 million first phase will rehabilitate the central wing as 72 units of senior housing that will be called St. Luke's Manor. The Ohio EPA recently declared that brownfield remediation is complete (PDF) for the 5.19-acre site.

In addition to proposing school closings and layoffs, Cleveland Metropolitan School District officials are considering placing the Board of Education Building in downtown Cleveland up for sale. Developer John Ferchill sought to redevelop the building as a hotel in the mid-1980s. Roldo Bartimole strongly opposes selling the building.

Update: the Cleveland Board of Education voted to close seven schools and lay off 643 teachers. Interim CEO Peter Raskind said that "there are no easy answers to the District's budget woes" and that "cuts in personnel and related expenses are unavoidable."

Cleveland City Council did not vote on an ordinance that would have protected some stained glass windows in churches designated as Cleveland landmarks. The future of the legislation is unclear.

Update: Channel 3 has more details.

Update 2: a Plain Dealer editorial concludes that "Council should give [the agreement] a fair hearing. "

Steven Litt says that traffic studies for the proposed Public Square redesign and the forthcoming Cleveland casino "could determine the character of downtown for decades to come." They have the potential to decide the balance between a downtown that is pedestrian-friendly and one that is automobile-oriented. A Plain Dealer editorial on the casino parking proposal says that the challenge of downtown development "is to balance the needs of new development against the existing architectural and visual elements that make downtown interesting and desirable."

Ohio Department of Transportation contractors are demolishing the Broadway Mills Building and the Marathon gas station located at the edge of the old Central Viaduct in downtown Cleveland. The buildings, deemed eligible but not listed on the National Register of Historic Places, are being razed for the new Innerbelt Bridge.

Cleveland casino developer Rock Ohio Caesars intends to place a valet parking center and a parking garage on the downtown block bounded by Ontario Street, Prospect Avenue, High Street, and East 2nd Street. Parking lot owner Lou Frangos acquired the properties for the casino. The plans may include the demolition of the historic Columbia Building on Prospect and the Stanley Block on Ontario. On Thursday, the Cleveland Landmarks Commission unanimously recommended designating the Stanley Block as a Cleveland landmark.

The $30 million renovation of the Allen Theatre at Playhouse Square in Cleveland is about halfway finished. Work is scheduled to be completed in August.

Parking lot owner Lou Frangos wants to demolish the Stanley Block, one of the oldest buildings in downtown Cleveland. In a series of recent acquisitions, companies linked to Frangos purchased the entire block at the southeast corner of Ontario Street and Prospect Avenue, with the exception of the Stanley Block, of which he acquired partial ownership. The City of Cleveland condemned the building last year, and the Cleveland Landmarks Commission will hold a public hearing about the building on Thursday.

Update: at the hearing, preservationists said that the building should be saved. The Landmarks Commission is scheduled to vote on a landmark designation at its March 10 meeting.

Developer Andrew Brickman would like to demolish an Edgewater Drive estate in Lakewood and build the Townhomes of Edgewater on the 2.6-acre site. The new development would consist of 14 detached 1,800 to 2,000-square-foot townhouses. Lakewood officials are also considering a proposal to raze the former St. Paul Lutheran Church on Detroit Avenue to make way for a new 14,000-square-foot CVS store.

Cleveland Area History reports that the congregation of the Euclid Avenue Church of God in Cleveland "has been offered an unspecified sum by the Cleveland Clinic in return for demolishing the structure, a Cleveland Landmark, and providing the Clinic with a vacant lot."

The Plain Dealer published more information about the planned demolition of the Walker and Weeks-designed James H. Foster house in Cleveland Heights. Habitat for Humanity is currently salvaging architectural details from the building.

The renovation of the former St. Luke's Medical Center will begin this week. The project's first phase will convert the central wing to 72 units of senior housing, and should be completed in 2012. The three-phase project could be completed by 2013.

Update: a Plain Dealer editorial called it "a perfect fit for this family-centered neighborhood."

Cleveland City Council authorized spending $387,000 on plans for the renovation of League Park. City officials have committed $5 million to the project, and hope to raise another $3.5 million in private donations.

The owners of the Walker and Weeks-designed James H. Foster house in Cleveland Heights intend to demolish the 1911 structure.

Update: Cleveland Area History has more information about the house (part 1, part 2).

The General Services Administration unveiled the design of the new facade for the Anthony J. Celebrezze Federal Building in downtown Cleveland. The new aluminum and glass skin, designed by architect Charles Young of Interactive Design Eight Architects in Chicago, is expected to reduce the building's annual energy costs by 17%. The Plain Dealer's Steven Litt said that the "project could be a bellwether for skylines across the country, especially for skyscrapers that fall somewhere below the level of landmarks worthy of preservation in pristine condition." Blair Kamin of the Chicago Tribune said that the "building stands to be transformed from a muscle-bound but middling work of mid-20th Century modernism into something delicate, diaphanous and endearing to the passerby."

Local officials and developers are encouraging Ohio legislators to renew the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program. The Ohio Department of Development's Urban Development Division is currently accepting applications for its sixth round, but will award credits only if the program is reauthorized.

Channel 3 looked at the renovations underway at the Tudor Arms building in University Circle. It is scheduled to reopen in March as a 157-room Doubletree Hotel.

The General Services Administration plans to replace the roof of the Anthony J. Celebrezze Federal Building in downtown Cleveland and to wrap the entire building with a new glass facade. Steven Litt described the work as "a fascinating case in which government is trying to balance two positive goals: historic preservation and energy conservation." The $121 million project is being funded by the federal stimulus program.

The purchasers of the landmark Big Dipper roller coaster indicated in December that there were issues with the sale, and now say that problems with the transfer of ownership have led them to walk away from the transaction.

Update: the Aurora Advocate has more information.

Hospice of Western Reserve is completing the deconstruction of the former St. Joseph Christian Life Center in Cleveland. They hope to finish by the end of the month.

Over the course of five days last week, the Westlake City Schools razed the historic Red Brick school building. The district had planned to demolish it earlier, but was delayed by asbestos abatement.

Update: West Life has details and videos.

While the future of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District's building program is in question, the school board voted to proceed with construction of three new elementary school buildings and to demolish 13 closed elementary schools.

The former Joseph & Feiss building on West 53rd Street in Cleveland was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 28.

Architect Chuck Miller of Doty & Miller makes suggestions for ways that environmentalists and historic preservationists can successfully work together instead of talking past each other.

Plans for the first phase of the Spillway project in Chagrin Falls have been scaled back. The initial redevelopment of the former Ivex mill is currently slated to include a microbrewery, a restaurant, offices, and some additional retail space.

A woman from southwest Ohio and a man from New Zealand purchased the Big Dipper roller coaster, sparing the Geauga Lake ride from threatened demolition. They intend to dismantle and store the coaster, and to reassemble it at an undetermined location.

Update: the Aurora Advocate and the Chagrin Valley Times published additional details.

The City of Cleveland will spend $298,000 to stabilize the landmark former Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist on Lake Avenue. The funds will be used for roof repairs, among other work.

After an unsuccessful attempt to sell the landmark roller coaster on eBay, the anonymous owner of the Big Dipper at Geauga Lake says the ride will be demolished if a buyer is not found by the end of Wednesday.

Information about some planned demolitions in Greater Cleveland:

Plans for redeveloping Westlake's historic Red Brick school as an arts center fell through. The Westlake City School District plans to demolish the building, and may raze it as early as next month.

Steven Litt toured the Tudor Arms building at Carnegie Avenue and East 107th Street. The University Circle landmark is currently under renovation, and is scheduled to reopen next year as a Doubletree Hotel.

The U.S. Coast Guard is seeking a new owner for the historic Cleveland Harbor West Pierhead Light (PDF) at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River. The lighthouse is available at no cost to government agencies, nonprofits, educational institutions, or community development organizations. Letters of interest are due by August 27.

(via the Cleveland Restoration Society)

The National Park Service selected Abcon Inc. of Youngstown to build the replacement Tinkers Creek Aqueduct on the Ohio & Erie Canal in Valley View. The $1.8 million project (PDF) will be funded by a federal stimulus grant.

With the annual Burning River Fest starting tomorrow, Ohio Authority looked at the status of the former Coast Guard station at Whiskey Island and some ideas for its reuse.

The historic East Ohio Gas Building on East 6th Street in downtown Cleveland will be renovated as offices for the Calfee, Halter & Griswold law firm. The $30 million project includes the construction of a 190-space parking garage on the surface lot behind the 1916 building. The building was purchased at auction for $1.3 million in 2009. Earlier proposals for the building called for redeveloping it as condominiums or a hotel.

Euclid Beach Park Now and the Euclid Beach Park Carousel Society announced plans to partner with the Western Reserve Historical Society to rebuild the Euclid Beach Park Carousel on the grounds of the Historical Society. They launched a $6 million fundraising campaign and hope to have the restored carousel running in University Circle by 2013.

Update: a Plain Dealer editorial supports the effort.

In the fourth round of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program, 13 projects were awarded $28.3 million in tax credits. Three Cuyahoga County properties were among the recipients: the Union Building in Cleveland, the former Berea Congregational United Church of Christ, and the Schofield Building in downtown Cleveland. It will be converted to a 140-room boutique hotel and 24 luxury apartments. While the program has been praised, this could be its final round. It's up for renewal, and could end if a new funding source is not identified.

The Lakewood Planning Commission approved a Historic Preservation Designation for St. James Church. The designation covers its exterior and interior, and it is the first time the City has protected a building's interior. St. James Parish will hold its final Mass on June 26.

The Baldwin-Wallace College South Campus Historic District (PDF) in Berea was recently added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Update: the News Sun has more details.

A reopening ceremony was held on Saturday morning for the Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Public Square, marking the completion of a two-year, $2 million restoration of its interior. The project included re-colorization, restoration of the sculptures and stained glass, new lighting and HVAC systems, and improved handicapped access. The gardens around the monument were also restored. Admission is free, and it is open to the public Monday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The landmark Prince Hall Masonic Temple on East 55th Street in Cleveland was heavily damaged in a Wednesday night fire. The cause is under investigation, but arson is suspected. Crews are preparing to demolish the building.

Update: the fire was ruled arson.

This week's issue of Scene presents a "Beginner's Guide to Dead Zones," a look at five vacant Cuyahoga County landmarks, plus several local examples of successful adaptive reuse.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation interviewed architect Paul Westlake about the restoration of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Cleveland.

Update: the National Trust also described the monument and the restoration process.

At the public forum on the redesign of Malls B and C, architect Mark Reddington of LMN Architects and landscape architect Shannon Nichol of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol shared their research and visions for the Mall. More than 100 people attended the event at the Cleveland Public Library.

Update: Doug Bardwell also summarized the forum.

The Cleveland Metropolitan School District announced plans to demolish 25 closed or closing school buildings. The list includes South and East high schools as well as seven buildings that are Cleveland landmarks or have pending landmark applications.

Update: Cleveland Area History looked at each of the schools slated for demolition. A Plain Dealer editorial said that it "smells like a tactic to evade an Ohio law requiring districts that sell vacant schools to let charter schools bid first."

The Cleveland Catholic Diocese will sell more than 50 closed churches, and placed 17 of them on the market. The properties in Cuyahoga, Lorain, and Summit counties have a total asking price of $11.8 million.

Grant Deming's Forest Hill Allotment Historic District in Cleveland Heights was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 13. It is the seventh and largest historic district in the City.

Update: the Sun Press published additional details.

A free public forum on the future of Cleveland's historic Mall will be held on May 6 at the Louis Stokes Wing of the CPL's Main Library.

The landmark Euclid Avenue Congregational Church in Cleveland was destroyed by an early Tuesday morning fire. The cause is not known, but a lightning strike is suspected. The blaze left the sandstone walls standing, but fire inspectors deemed them too unstable and the remains are being demolished.

Update: Cleveland Area History asks if it would have been possible to preserve part of the church. A few elements were saved.

Update 2: Lightning was confirmed as the cause of the fire.

The Temple–Tifereth Israel and Case Western Reserve University announced that the congregation's historic University Circle synagogue will be renovated as the Milton and Tamar Maltz Center for Performing Arts. It will be the home of the University's performing arts programs, while continuing to serve as a place of worship on holidays and other occasions. The Maltz Family Foundation donated $12 million for the $25.6 million project.

Update: a Plain Dealer editorial calls it "a win-win -- and then some."

In January, the Cleveland Clinic demolished the former Hathaway Brown School building on Chester Avenue without a public hearing. Because the Clinic's campus lies in a gap between design review districts, less public oversight is required. Historic preservationists would like to expand the districts to include the Cleveland Clinic and Cleveland Play House properties, among other sites. Bill Barrow believes that the local approach to preservation "is too unplanned, piecemeal and last-minute to be effective."

Today's Plain Dealer looked at some of Cleveland's overlooked architectural treasures, including the Soldiers and Sailors Monument. Meanwhile, Cleveland Area History is working on a list of the 100 most significant landmarks in Cleveland.

A Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge voided the sheriff's sale of the Cleveland Cold Storage building. The Ohio Department of Transportation still intends to demolish the building to make way for the planned new Innerbelt Bridge, but now may have to pay a higher price in its eminent domain acquisition.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation has an update on the rescue and renaissance of the Cozad-Bates House in University Circle.

The restoration of Cleveland's Playhouse Square began 40 years ago today when Ray Shepardson first visited the State Theatre.

The Medical Mart and convention center project in Cleveland will include severing Public Auditorium from the complex. The City of Cleveland will invest $5 million in upgrades to Public Auditorium, and Cuyahoga County will demolish a 1964 addition, restore its west face, and remove the ramp on the east side of the Mall. MMPI is still targeting an October groundbreaking.

The Cleveland Landmarks Commission recommended designating six additional Catholic churches as Cleveland landmarks. Four of the six are slated to close as part of the Cleveland Catholic Diocese's consolidation program. Diocesan officials are not pleased.

Participants on yesterday's Sound of Ideas program discussed investments in public spaces, focusing on the concepts for redesigning Cleveland's Public Square. The page also includes an interview with architect Peter van Dijk about the restoration of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Public Square.

Lakewood City Council approved legislation that expands the City's historic preservation ordinance to include publicly-accessible building interiors. City officials say that it's not targeted at any particular building.

Lakewood City Council is scheduled to vote next week on legislation that would strengthen the City's historic preservation ordinance. It could be used to protect St. James Catholic Church, which is scheduled to close in June 2010.

The Ohio Department of Development awarded $23.7 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits to 12 projects across the state. The only recipient in Cuyahoga County was the Cowell & Hubbard Building in downtown Cleveland. The Playhouse Square Foundation purchased the building in 2007.

Cleveland Councilman Joe Cimperman helped to organize four public meetings about the Medical Mart for early 2010. Roldo Bartimole interpreted them as a political maneuver. Mayor Jackson spoke about the Medical Mart on Channel 3's Between the Lines and defended Public Auditorium on Channel 5. Commissioner Jones thinks that Cleveland should reduce its asking price for the property MMPI desires for its revised Medical Mart plans. The Cleveland chapter of the American Institute of Architects opposes the new plans, and Steven Litt considered the aesthetic costs of building on Mall C.

Meanwhile, the developers of the proposed Nashville Medical Trade Center announced the site for the 2 million-square-foot complex, increasing pressure on MMPI to demonstrate progress in Cleveland. Developers of both projects have stressed the importance of being the first to open.

The Ohio Department of Transportation is proceeding with property acquisition for its planned new Innerbelt Bridge, including the purchase of three historic buildings that it intends to demolish. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2011, and will cause traffic disruptions until work in completed in 2017. Local cyclists continue to advocate for the inclusion of a bicycle and pedestrian lane. They will hold a rally in Tremont on Sunday.

Update: Renovating the Rust Belt has more details about the proposal for pedestrian and cyclist access. Steven Litt also described the efforts of bicycle advocates.

Frank Jackson, displeased with what he views as a lack of communication from MMPI, yesterday sent the company a list of questions (PDF) about the the proposed changes in the design of the Medical Mart. He also said that the City will hire a consultant to independently assess the condition of Public Auditorium. Steven Litt reviewed MMPI's revised plan and is dubious of its merits.

On the most recent Feagler & Friends program, architect Peter van Dijk, Levin College Dean Ned Hill, and the Plain Dealer's Steven Litt discussed the changing plans for the Medical Mart in Cleveland. A Plain Dealer editorial said that the project should move forward. The paper also posted MMPI's photographs of Public Auditorium's obsolete utilities.

Update: the Plain Dealer shared more details of MMPI's presentation on the issues with Public Auditorium.

The Plain Dealer and Channel 3 have more details about the dispute between the Ohio Department of Transportation and Fred Finley, owner of the Cleveland Cold Storage building.

Update: a judge returned control of the building to Finley pending a January hearing.

The $21 million renovation of the Union Gospel Press building in Tremont should be completed by the end of the year. About half of the units in the 175,000-square-foot complex have been rented.

The owner of the Cleveland Cold Storage building says that he has been treated unfairly by the Ohio Department of Transportation. Also known as the Distribution Terminal Warehouse, it is one of several historic buildings that ODOT intends to demolish for the planned new Innerbelt Bridge.

MMPI's announcement that they now intend to build the Medical Mart at the northern edge of Mall C surprised Cleveland leaders, and they are concerned about the proposed changes. Steven Litt considered the architectural and urban design implications of the new site and how Public Auditorium would fit in. Commissioner Hagan defended MMPI, while Mayor Jackson still wants the company to renovate Public Auditorium.

Update: a Plain Dealer editorial said that the recent events underscore the need for better communication. MedCity News compared the project's timetable with those of competing developments in Nashville and New York City.

Citing higher than anticipated costs, MMPI dropped its plans to renovate Public Auditorium and to use it and neighboring properties as the site of the planned Medical Mart. MMPI officials say they are considering multiple alternatives, but are focusing on building it on Mall C, also known as Strawbridge Plaza.

Update: the changes could also delay the project.

The National Park Service completed (PDF) its environmental assessment for the proposed replacement of the Tinkers Creek Aqueduct in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. It recommends the construction of a replacement aqueduct. The assessment's public comment period ends on November 29.

The exterior renovation of the Bailey Building in downtown Lakewood began last week. The work is scheduled to finish in the spring.

Update: the Lakewood Observer and Sun Post-Herald have more details.

Cleveland Area History is a new weblog that describes itself as having "an opinionated, vocal, approach to history, preservation, and related issues in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area."

The Cleveland Clinic completed the purchase of the Cleveland Play House property on Euclid Avenue, buying the 11.29-acre site for $13 million. The Clinic will lease the complex back to the Play House for free until at least the end of 2011. The Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland will leave the facilities when the Play House completes its move to Playhouse Square.

Update: the Plain Dealer published more details.

The proposed Grant W. Deming Forest Hill Allotment Historic District in Cleveland Heights is pending approval by the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board. The City and Ohio Historic Preservation Office will hold a public meeting about the proposal on October 26 at the Superior Schoolhouse.

The Cuyahoga Valley National Park is beginning (PDF) an environmental impact statement for the modification or removal of the Canal Diversion Dam on the Cuyahoga River in Brecksville. The dam provides water for the Ohio & Erie Canal, but impairs the river's water quality. The study will attempt to balance the historic preservation and environmental perspectives. The public is invited to provide input at a meeting at the Happy Days Lodge on October 28.

Northeast Shores Development Corporation purchased the LaSalle Theater in North Collinwood and intends to renovate the landmark building.

The Gordon Square Arts District celebrated the completion of the Detroit Avenue streetscape project on Saturday. The grand re-opening of the district's Capitol Theatre will be held on October 2, and the festivities will continue for 10 days. A Plain Dealer editorial says that "this should be an important and joyous week for the residents of Cleveland's Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood."

Update: WCPN and the Plain Dealer have more information.

Lakewood City Council is considering legislation that would expand the City's historic preservation ordinance to cover the interior of historic structures.

Update: the Plain Dealer has more information about the Lakewood proposal and similar legislation in Cleveland.

Hospice of the Western Reserve recently purchased the 12-acre St. Joseph Christian Life Center property from the Cleveland Catholic Diocese. The hospice intends to eventually demolish the site's landmark four-story retreat house.

The owners of the Bailey Building in downtown Lakewood plan to remove its 1960s concrete facade to reveal the original 1920s brick building.

The retention of the Innerbelt ramp at Carnegie Avenue may be tied to the future of the nearby Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court building, which the County will vacate when its new Juvenile Justice Center in Fairfax is completed. It is not listed in the National Register of Historic Places, but was determined to be eligible for inclusion.

The renovated Capitol Theatre in the Gordon Square Arts District is scheduled to open on October 3. The movie theater is owned by the Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization and will be managed by Cleveland Cinemas. It will show a mix of mainstream and independent films.

Cleveland State University is demolishing the landmark Corlett Building on Euclid Avenue. Its site will be used for parking, greenspace, and possibly for a farmers market. An arts center has also been proposed for the site. Urban Ohio has a picture of the demolition.

(via Cleveland Design City)

Plain Dealer theater critic Tony Brown said that the Cleveland Play House's plan to move from Fairfax to Playhouse Square "looks like the best deal under the circumstances."

The Cleveland Clinic will purchase the 295,000-square foot Cleveland Play House and its 12-acre property at Euclid Avenue and at East 85th Street. The price was not disclosed, but the Plain Dealer reports it will be in the $13–15 million range. The agreement includes a two-year leaseback clause (PDF) that will allow the Play House time to arrange its planned move to the Allen Theatre at Playhouse Square.

The multi-year renovation of the Terminal Tower is nearing completion, and the Plain Dealer published a large infographic about the history and restoration of the skyscraper, plus current and historic photographs. The building will turn 80 next year.

The Cuyahoga Valley National Park is conducting an environmental assessment for the second phase of the Tinkers Creek Aqueduct rehabilitation and replacement in Valley View. Phase 1, the construction of a pedestrian bridge and the routing of water through temporary pipes, was completed in 2007. The proposed phase 2 includes the installation of new aqueduct structure, and would be funded with $1 to $2 million of federal stimulus funds. The National Park Service will accept public comments until July 31.

Update: the Sun Courier has more details.

Different groups have different visions for the best place to rebuild the 1909 Euclid Beach carousel. Northeast Shores Development Corporation and Euclid Beach Park Now want to install it near its original location and a planned recreation center and pier. They say it could be ready in two years. Another group, the Cleveland Carousel, is raising money to rebuild it elsewhere in Cleveland.

The Ohio Department of Development will begin accepting applications for round three of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program on July 1.

Update: the Plain Dealer has more details.

The City of Cleveland quietly initiated repairs of the historic Coast Guard station at Whiskey Island. Workers have begun replacing its deteriorated roof. At the same time, a group of Coast Guard veterans is bringing a retired Coast Guard cutter to Cleveland. They hope to restore it as a maritime museum at the station.

Update: the Apalachee arrived in Cleveland on Sunday.

Cleveland Councilwoman Dona Brady introduced legislation that would designate Saints Philip and James church and school as a Cleveland Landmark. It is one of the churches being closed by the Cleveland Catholic Diocese.

Officials with the Cleveland Play House and the Cleveland Clinic confirmed that they are negotiating a sale of the Play House property at East 85th Street. The Plain Dealer reported that the price will be around $13 million to $15 million.

Update: Tony Brown and Steven Litt of the Plain Dealer discussed the anticipated sale.

The historic Singletary House in Streetsboro was moved to a new foundation on Tuesday.

The Westlake Historical Society is seeking financial assistance from the City of Westlake for a restoration and expansion of the historic Weston House.

The Finance Committee of Cleveland City Council approved $211,000 in redevelopment funding for the purchase of the Variety Theater on Lorain Avenue. The Friends of the Variety Theater organization has already secured the remainder of the building's $1 million asking price.

The Inglewood Historic District in Cleveland Heights was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 15.

Local bloggers provided recaps of several recent events:

A town hall meeting about the Big Dipper will be held on April 25 at the VFW hall in Aurora. Organizers say that the event will celebrate the history of the roller coaster and explore options for preserving it.

Developers of the Spillway project in Chagrin Falls have nearly completed designing the mixed-use development, and are working to align financing and tenants.

In this week's Scene, Michael Gill considers the future of the churches that the Cleveland Catholic Diocese will close in 2010. Because the church buildings will lose their property tax exemptions once they are no longer used by the Diocese, the Diocese may demolish the churches to reduce its tax obligations.

Update: the Plain Dealer's Steven Litt also examined the challenges of preserving historic church buildings. The Ohio & Erie Chapter of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Classical America will lead a tour of St. Colman and St. Stephen (PDF) churches on April 18.

The Cleveland Play House has entered into talks to join Cleveland State University's drama program in a move to the Allen Theater (PDF) at Playhouse Square. Reconfiguring and expanding the Allen Theater would cost an estimated $30 million, and the Play House's longtime home in Midtown is for sale. The Cleveland Clinic is believed to be interested in the 12-acre site, which abuts its main campus. Steven Litt notes that the future of the existing Play House complex is now uncertain. The complex includes two historic 1926 theaters and a notable 1983 postmodern addition designed by Philip Johnson, and is not protected by any landmark ordinances.

Update: a Plain Dealer editorial enthusiastically supports the concept.

The Cleveland Clinic will soon raze the Art Deco Carnegie Medical Building at Carnegie Avenue and East 105th Street in Cleveland. The Clinic has no immediate plans to build on the site, which will be used as a surface parking lot.

The owner of the deteriorating Hilliard Square Theatre in Lakewood hopes to sell the building to someone who would restore it.

The restoration of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Public Square is continuing. The work is scheduled to be completed this fall.

Heritage Ohio, a statewide historic preservation and downtown development organization, launched a redesigned website and Ohio Downtown Revitalization, a new weblog.

Some members of Cleveland City Council are pursing landmark designations for churches that the Cleveland Catholic Diocese intends to close as part of its restructuring. The designation would disrupt the Church's plans to remove stained glass windows and other architectural details from the buildings.

Update: City Council may expand its landmark law to cover the interiors of historic buildings. City Council will also consider legislation intended to slow down the potential destruction of closed churches.

The Cuyahoga Valley National Park will rehabilitate four structures in Boston Township for use by the Park's volunteer support organizations. The Cuyahoga Valley National Park Association has raised over ⅔ of the funds (PDF) for the $855,000 project.

In a special election yesterday, Chagrin Falls voters approved a rezoning for the former Ivex mill. Developers plan to reuse the structure as a mixed-use facility.

Update: the unofficial final tally was 937-88.

Environmentalists want to remove the canal diversion dam on the Cuyahoga River in Brecksville in order to improve the river's health. However, the dam supplies water to the Ohio & Erie Canal, a National Historic Landmark. The Ohio EPA and the Cuyahoga Valley National Park are studying ways to remove the dam and keep water flowing through the canal. A Plain Dealer editorial supports their efforts.

Steven Litt likes the plans for redeveloping the Ivex complex in Chagrin Falls. He says that the "project looks like a no-brainer," and concludes that "it could make Chagrin Falls both a better place to visit, and a better place to live."

Neighbors of the former Ivex mill in Chagrin Falls are concerned about the potential impacts of its proposed redevelopment. Residents will vote on a rezoning issue for the project in a special election on February 3.

The Plain Dealer looked at the renovation plans for the closed Variety Theater on Lorain Avenue in Cleveland's West Boulevard neighborhood and the La Salle Theater on East 185th Street in North Collinwood.

The old Commodore Theater in Collinwood has been demolished.

A historic trolley depot that previously was part of the Trolleyville USA collection in Olmsted Township will be moved to Grand Pacific Junction in Olmsted Falls.

The renovation of the Baker Electric Building on Euclid Avenue in Midtown has revealed many historic elements that had been obscured. The $7.1 million project already has attracted a half-dozen tenants.

Research on the small house on Denison Avenue in Old Brooklyn indicates that it likely was built in 1853 by the son of one of Brooklyn Township's first settlers. Meanwhile, the North Olmsted Landmarks Commission may designate the Standen House on Kennedy Ridge Road as a historic property.

The Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Public Square will be closed for the next eight to nine months while its interior undergoes restoration.

Plain Dealer critics Steven Litt and Tony Brown compared notes about the renovated Hanna Theatre at Playhouse Square in Cleveland.

The Chagrin Falls Planning Commission unanimously approved a rezoning for the proposed mixed-use redevelopment of the Ivex mill. Some of its neighbors strongly object to the project, and developers have requested a special election on the rezoning.

Cleveland Councilman Brian Cummins is looking for more information about a small house on Denison Avenue. It was built in the 1840s, but has been poorly maintained and could be demolished.

The Ohio Department of Development announced the recipients in the second round of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program today. Of the 48 projects selected, 14 are in Cleveland. The Terminal Tower, St. Luke's Hospital, and the East Ohio Gas Building on East 6th Street each received credits valued at an estimated $5 million.

The Ohio Historic Preservation Office recommended awarding federal tax credits for the planned renovation of the Cleveland Trust Tower in downtown Cleveland. The tax credits could be worth $8-$10 million for the $133 million project.

Mark Souther writes about the start of an endeavor to add Grant Deming's Forest Hill Allotment in Cleveland Heights to the National Register of Historic Places.

The historic Singletary House in Streetsboro is again threatened. In 2006, the house was moved from its second location to make room for a Wal-Mart, but a new foundation was never built. The Streetsboro Heritage Foundation needs $51,600 to complete the work.

The final two stories in WKSU's NEO Development series explore the role of fresh water in the region's redevelopment and how historic preservation and adaptive reuse are helping to create a sense of place.

Chagrin Falls leaders say they need more information about the plans for the former Ivex mill before voting on a requested rezoning.

The Shaker Heights Landmark Commission gave its 2008 Preservation Awards to First Baptist Church, Plymouth Church, and the Shaker Heights City Schools. In Strongsville, the renovated Old Town Hall was formally reopened.

Great Lakes Theater Festival's renovation of the Hanna Theatre is finished. Tony Brown of the Plain Dealer is amazed that the company has "managed to accomplish this stunning project in the fairly short span of nine months." A grand reopening gala will be held on September 20.

The nonprofit Siegel and Shuster Society is raising funds to restore the former Glenville home of Superman co-creator Jerry Siegel. The first of four auctions raised $34,459 of the $50,000 goal. Owners Hattie and Jefferson Gray agreed to give the Society first rights to buy the house if they decide to sell.

The Lakewood Observer toured the vacant Hilliard Square Theatre on Hilliard Road. It is one of eight buildings that will be featured in the Lakewood Historical Society's House Tour on Sunday.

Cedar Fair may postpone the sale of large portions of the former Geauga Lake site because the company feels that the offers for the land are too low. The delay could provide more time for the roller coaster enthusiasts seeking to preserve the Big Dipper.

Alcoa completed the sale of the Ivex Paper Mill complex in Chagrin Falls to a group of local developers for $400,000. They plan to renovate as many of its 28 buildings as they can.

Update: the Chagrin Herald Sun supplies more details.

The Twinsburg Architectural Review Board is concerned about the increasing number of historic homes that have been allowed to fall into disrepair and subsequently demolished. Earlier this year, the City discontinued a home repair loan program.

The Ohio Department of Development will announce additional historic preservation tax credit awards before the end of September. Changes to the rules place a greater emphasis on the potential economic benefits of redevelopment and a more equitable distribution across the state. A large percentage of the round one awards went to projects in Cleveland.

Although earlier plans to rehabilitate the landmark Fifth Church of Christ Scientist on West 117th Street fell through, Cleveland officials now plan to incorporate the building into a mixed-use redevelopment of its entire block.

The Geauga County Historical Society is working to save some of the historic structures at Geauga Lake by relocating them to its Century Village in Burton.

Preservationist Steve McQuillin shares his thoughts about the restoration and renovation of the Cleveland Museum of Art's 1916 building, and encourages the museum to continue a public dialogue about the remainder of the expansion plans.

Cedar Fair is in negotiations with three companies for the sale of the former Geauga Lake site. They reached an agreement with an unidentified buyer for Geauga Lake Hotel and the 11 acres that surround it. Another company is interested in building retail on 100 acres on the west end of the property, and a third wants to build housing on 440 acres between the other two areas. Meanwhile, roller coaster enthusiasts are pessimistic about the future of the historic Big Dipper.

Plain Dealer theater critic Tony Brown provides more photographs of the ongoing renovations of the Hanna Theatre at Playhouse Square.

Alcoa accepted a bid from a partnership of three Chagrin Valley residents for the historic Ivex mill in Chagrin Falls. The price was not disclosed. They plan to convert the 1841 building to a community center featuring a hotel, theater, and microbrewery.

The Kresge Foundation awarded a $1 million challenge grant to Great Lakes Theater Festival for the renovations of the Hanna Theatre at Playhouse Square.

The Plain Dealer began a new series about the "finest elements of Cleveland's stylish history" with a look at the history of the Lake Shore in Lakewood.

A Plain Dealer editorial says that "Ohio has done the right thing" in reviving the Historic Preservation Tax Credit program.

MyHometownOhio lists the changes to the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program that were made as part of the recent economic stimulus package.

Update: The Plain Dealer has more details about the changes.

The Plain Dealer briefly looked at the positives and challenges of reusing former school buildings, including the threatened Avon Center School.

The landmark Big Dipper roller coaster was tentatively sold to an undisclosed buyer at the Geauga Lake auction today. The purchaser intends to move it to an as-yet unannounced location and reassemble it "not as a ride, but as a nostalgia piece."

Last month, the Cleveland Restoration Society and AIA Cleveland gave their annual preservation awards to 13 projects in Northeast Ohio.

(via Cool Cleveland)

The Plain Dealer looked into the status of the two remaining disassembled Hulett ore unloaders at Whiskey Island.

The U.S. General Services Administration posted a video about the history and the award-winning renovation of the Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse on Public Square.

About 400 people celebrated the start of renovation of the Capitol Theatre in Cleveland yesterday. A Plain Dealer editorial says that the $7 million project "could be the star of a much needed revival of the down-on-its heels Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood."

The renovation of the Capitol Theatre in the Gordon Square Arts District will begin tomorrow, following a celebration this afternoon. It is scheduled to reopen next April as a theater showing art and independent films.

With the ongoing renovation of the Terminal Tower at its halfway point, the Plain Dealer reported on the work and highlighted a 1928 movie of its construction that was acquired by Cleveland State University in 2004 and added to the Cleveland Union Terminal Collection.

This year's Richard Shatten Public Policy Case Competition looked at the future of the former Coast Guard station at Whiskey Island. Cleveland officials have been discussing the possibility of turning the station into an environmental history interpretive center with a small restaurant.

Cleveland State University and the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority will share the costs of restoring three WPA murals that were salvaged from the former Valleyview Homes in Tremont. Two of the murals will be installed in the University's new student center once it is built. Another piece of art from the complex will be installed in a community center at Tremont Pointe.

Yesterday, Cleveland City Council approved a $1.5 million, 30 year low-interest loan for the rennovation of the Capitol Theatre at Detroit Avenue and West 65th Street.

The Plain Dealer's Tony Brown narrated an audio slideshow about the ongoing renovation of the Hanna Theatre at Playhouse Square.

A Plain Dealer editorial says that state officials erred in limiting participation in the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program, and urges them to remove the "outrageous and capricious cap".

GreenCityBlueLake examined the green renovation of the historic Baker Electric Building on Euclid Avenue in Midtown.

The Plain Dealer reviewed the history of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program, the controversial decision to cap its funding at $120 million, and the program's potential direction in the future.

Several Ohio property owners are suing the Ohio Department of Development, claiming that the agency's decision to halt the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program was illegal. The proposed Ohio stimulus package may include additional funding for the program.

The Inglewood Historic District in Cleveland Heights may be added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Olmsted Falls City Council established a moratorium on demolitions of historical buildings and landmarks while it works to correct contradictory language in the municipal codes.

For the second time, the K&D Group was the sole bidder for the Ameritrust complex in downtown Cleveland. The bid was for the $35 million minimum set by Cuyahoga County. The developer's plans are similar to its earlier proposal, with a mix of hotel, residential, and office uses in renovated and new space. The company hired the firm of Westlake Reed Leskosky to design the proposed new office tower at Prospect Avenue and East 9th Street. Channel 3 has images of the proposal.

Although Alcoa is pursuing permits to demolish all 28 buildings of the Ivex complex in Chagrin Falls, including the 1841 mill, the company says its intention is to sell the buildings and property for an adaptive reuse of the site. Alcoa is also planning to lower the height of the Chagrin River dam and stabilize the riverbank.

Update: Alcoa revised its application to remove references to demolitions of historic structures.

The Plain Dealer took a brief look at the history of the Sidaway Bridge in Cleveland.

Budget shortfalls have delayed the planned renovation of League Park by one year. Ken Silliman, Mayor Jackson's chief of staff, said that "It's every bit of a project as it was last summer. It's just set back a little in time."

In order to make the Cleveland Trust Tower more attractive to prospective developers, Cuyahoga County will invest up to $4 million in additional asbestos abatement.

The Tudor Arms in University Circle and Strongsville's Old Town Hall were recently added to the National Register of Historic Places.

With the Great Lakes Theater Festival poised to move to the Hanna Theatre when renovations are complete, the Plain Dealer looks back at the history of its current home, the Ohio Theatre.

By a vote of 5-2, Olmsted Falls City Council overrode the Architectural Board of Review's decision and approved the demolition of a bungalow in the City's historic district.

Nine more properties in Cleveland received awards through the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program. Locally, the largest credits went to the Higbee Building ($7.8 million), the Cleveland Institute of Art's McCullough Center ($5.7 million), the Hanna Building ($4.6 million), and the Union Gospel Press building ($4.4 million). It was the third and final announcement in round one of the awards. MyHometownOhio reports that there will not be a second round because the program reached its $120 million limit. The Plain Dealer listed the status of all local applicants.

Developer Greg Romes of Lake Pointe Construction plans to demolish the former Avon Center School on Detroit Road to make way for a shopping center. The one-room schoolhouse was built in 1910.

The Cleveland Clinic is free to demolish the Art Deco Carnegie Medical Building at Carnegie Avenue and East 105th Street, now that it has obtained permission from the University Circle Design Review Committee. The Cleveland Planning Commission approved the demolition last month. By 2009, the eight story building will be replaced by a 206 space parking lot.

The historic Barton Road Church, moved to the Frostville Museum in 2005, will be rededicated on August 3 as the Frostville Church. The restored church will serve as a museum and wedding chapel.

The Cleveland Clinic would like to demolish the Art Deco Carnegie Medical Building (the former home of the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine) at Carnegie Avenue and East 105th Street and use the site as a parking lot and for possible future development. The University Circle Design Review Committee (PDF) tabled the request, citing incomplete information about the Clinic's proposal.

The Cleveland Catholic Diocese has the former St. Joseph Christian Life Center on Lake Shore Boulevard listed for sale at $2.75 million. The Cleveland Landmarks Commission has proposed designating the 1927 building and its 11½ acre lakefront site as a historic landmark.

The renovation of the former Warner and Swasey Observatory in East Cleveland was halted after the owner was indicted for mortgage fraud last January.

The owner of a River Road bungalow in the Olmsted Falls Historic District wants to demolish the house, because it would be cheaper to replace than expand. The City's Architectural Board of Review rejected the request, and he has appealed to City Council. A public hearing will be held on January 31.

While Cedar Fair markets the 500 acre Geauga Lake site, a group of roller coaster enthusiasts is continuing its efforts to preserve a portion of the closed amusement park and the Big Dipper roller coaster.

The Great Lakes Theater Festival has raised 75% of the $19.2 million it needs for planned renovations of the Hanna Theatre at Playhouse Square. Architecture firm Westlake Reed Leskosky will unveil its designs for the Theatre today.

Update: a Plain Dealer editorial says that the fundraising drive and proposed renovations "deserve a standing ovation from Northeast Ohio theatergoers."

On this morning's Weekly Business Roundup on WCPN, Scott Roulston talked about the K&D Group's bid to purchase the Ameritrust complex in Cleveland.

Cuyahoga County officials unsealed bids today for the Ameritrust complex at Euclid Avenue and East 9th Street. Although they were expecting several bids (PDF), the only package was a $35 million bid from the K&D Group of Willoughby. The company's plans call for converting the Cleveland Trust Tower to a 170 room hotel and 200 residential units. They also want to construct a new 200,000 square foot office tower at Prospect Avenue and East 9th Street and build additional parking and residential space.

Update: the Plain Dealer also reported on the bid and reactions to the news.

The Ohio Department of Development gave 11 more awards through the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program, including six in Cleveland. The largest tax credit in Cleveland, valued at an estimated $1.4 million, went to the Scott A. Rogers Co. Building, part of the University Lofts development near Cleveland State University. The Capitol Theater in the Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood received a tax credit worth an estimated $1.1 million.

The Cleveland Foundation awarded $21.2 million in grants, including $3.6 million to Case Western Reserve University for the Great Lakes Institute for Energy Innovation, $4 million to the Fund for Our Economic Future, $525,000 to ShoreBank Enterprise Group Cleveland, and $750,000 to the Great Lakes Theater Festival for the Hanna Theatre renovations.

The LaSalle Theater on East 185th Street in Cleveland was recently acquired by its lender in a foreclosure sale. The Northeast Shores Development Corporation is seeking ideas from the public for the best use of the building's former theater space.

Cuyahoga County officials expect to receive as many as five bids on the Cleveland Trust Tower by their January 16 deadline. The County has spent $5.9 million on asbestos removal and architectural design for the tower.

The Ohio Department of Development awarded $30 million in historic tax credits to five downtown Cleveland renovation projects. The largest credit, valued at $16.4 million, went to the 668 Euclid building.

(Update: a Plain Dealer editorial is very positive about the program.)

A group of roller coaster enthusiasts hopes to preserve the historic Big Dipper at Geauga Lake as the centerpiece of a redevelopment of the former amusement park. The park's wooden roller coaters were recently listed for sale.

(Update: The Aurora Advocate has more details.)

Cuyahoga County is preparing to accept bids on the Ameritrust complex at Euclid Avenue and East 9th Street. The County Commissioners will sell the property if they are able to recoup their $35 million investment. Last week, architect Jane Weinzapfel spoke in favor of preserving the Breuer Tower, and yesterday, Steven Litt mentioned that "the tower has been damaged irreparably" by workers performing asbestos abatement.

Last week, local architects offered advice to Beck Center leaders on how the current facilities could be restored and modernized. Increasing the efficiency of the complex is a priority.

A series of events will be held this month about modernist architecture, its reuse and preservation, and the Breuer Tower.

Financial concerns and competing priorities have led the Cuyahoga County Commissioners to reconsider their plans for a new county administration building at East 9th Street and Euclid Avenue. If they can break even, they may sell the former Ameritrust complex to a private developer. The National Trust for Historic Preservation recently asked the Commissioners to investigate the sale of the Cleveland Trust Tower to "a preservation-sensitive developer".

Plans for the restoration of the landmark Variety Theater on Lorain Avenue in Cleveland continue to move forward. Cleveland City Council recently approved a $170,000 loan to the Friends of the Historic Variety Theater, and a West Side Sun editorial says that "the plans are creating ripples of excitement in the West 117th Street area."

Members of the Midwest Railway Preservation Society are continuing their efforts to restore the former Baltimore & Ohio roundhouse on West 3rd Street in the Flats.

Cleveland City Council is expected to vote on a $1.5 million Core City loan for the planned $6.7 million renovation of the Capitol Theater at West 65th Street and Detroit Avenue.

The Cleveland Heights Landmarks Commission designated the 1896 Elizabeth Keyes Churchill House on Chestnut Hills Drive as a Cleveland Heights Landmark.

With the Hanna Theatre scheduled to close in December for renovations, the Plain Dealer looks back at the theater's history and presents a photo gallery.

The Hanna Theatre at Playhouse Square will undergo a $20 million renovation. Work could begin as soon as December and be completed by next fall.

Cleveland City Council is expected to renew a purchase agreement with Marous Development for the former Fifth Church of Christ Scientist building on West 117th Street. The property may become more attractive for redevelopment if the adjacent Giant Eagle store were to close when a nearby new store opens.

A coalition of local leaders have proposed designating the entire Connecticut Western Reserve as a National Historic Area. The designation could bring an annual $1 million in federal funds for ten years to the the area that covers all or part of 13 Northeast Ohio counties.

(via Advance Northeast Ohio)

The Ohio Historical Society nominated Strongsville's Old Town Hall for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places.

The first phase of the Tinkers Creek Aqueduct project in Valley View was completed, and the section of the canal was reopened. Phase two is under design, and the National Park is seeking $1 million for construction.

Last Wednesday, the Cleveland Restoration Society presented eleven awards for historic preservation projects in Northeast Ohio.

Chagrin Falls Village Council unanimously approved a set of revisions to the Village's historic preservation regulations. The changes were designed to remove subjective language and make the rules more defensible in court.

Owners of historic structures in Cleveland submitted 32 of the 69 applications for the new Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit. The properties include the Terminal Tower, Higbee Building, Cleveland Trust Rotunda, and the Cleveland Athletic Club.

The Lakewood Sun Post offers more details about Birdtown's recent listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

Developer John Ferchill offered an alternative redevelopment plan for a portion of the Cleveland Trust complex at Euclid Avenue and East 9th Street in downtown Cleveland. He suggested rehabilitating the 1010 Euclid building as condominiums and restoring the rotunda, with 35% of it to be used by Cuyahoga County, and the remainder to be used by county-related businesses.

Yesterday's launch of the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit program attracted a crowd to the Ohio Historic Preservation Office in Columbus, as applicants camped out in line over the weekend for the first-come, first-served application process. The office opened at 8:00, and by 11:00 a.m., applications for 63 projects had been filed. 100 projects will be financed this year.

Roldo Bartimole feels that the people who would profit from the construction of a medical mart and a new convention center should pay for it, and also laments the Cleveland City Planning Commission's decision on the Cleveland Trust Tower. The Plain Dealer and Channel 3 present additional details about the vote to demolish the downtown skyscraper.

This morning, the Cleveland City Planning Commission is again discussing Cuyahoga County's request to demolish the Cleveland Trust Tower. A Plain Dealer editorial once again urges the Planning Commission to approve the demolition, and Nathan C. Hoyt of Davis Brody Bond explains the architecture firm's proposal for reusing the tower.

(Update: the Planning Commission approved the demolition by a vote of 5-2, and Frank Jackson said they made the right decision. The Planning Commission did not authorize the demolition of the adjacent 1010 Euclid building.)

While Cuyahoga County has a legal opinion that states Cleveland's charter gives the County the right to overrule the Cleveland City Planning Commission and demolish the Cleveland Trust Tower, Commissioner Hagan said they "will not move ahead unless the mayor and council president assures us that under the charter we can move ahead without acquiescence of the planning commission." Plain Dealer architecture critic Steven Litt feels that bypassing the Planning Commission would place it at a disadvantage in the future.

At the June 8 Planning Commission meeting, former Cleveland Planning Director Hunter Morrison presented his Seven Decision-making Principles for Major Redevelopment Projects.

By a vote of 4-2, the Cleveland City Planning Commission refused to approve a demolition permit for the Cleveland Trust Tower. Today's New York Times includes an overview of the controversy surrounding the downtown skyscraper.

Preservation Ohio launched the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit Resource Center, "a one-stop location for information on the newest financial incentive for renovation and restoration of historic buildings in Ohio." The presentation (PDF) from last month's Northeast Ohio Historic Tax Credit training seminar is also available online.

The Chatter column in this week's Free Times covers increased emissions from the Mittal Steel mill in Cleveland and the discussion about the proposed demolition of the Cleveland Trust Tower before the Cleveland City Planning Commission.The Planning Commission will take up the question again on Friday, and Plain Dealer architecture critic Steven Litt feels it's likely that the City will approve the demolition.

The repaired Euclid Beach Park Gateway Arch was rededicated this morning.

The City of Cleveland is planning renovations to historic League Park in Hough that include restoring the ballfield, building a replica of the outfield wall, and renovating the ticket house, a tunnel, and the original brick wall. The project is expected to cost $8.5 million, of which the City will supply $5 million. Officials hope to raise the rest of the money through private donations.

The Cleveland City Planning Commission decided on Friday that they need more details before they decide on Cuyahoga County's request to demolish the Cleveland Trust Tower.

The City of Cleveland and the Wendy Park Foundation are close to an agreement that would authorize repairs of the pier to the historic Whiskey Island Coast Guard station. The deteriorating station remains in need of repair.

On Friday, the Cleveland City Planning Commission heard from architects who advocated an adaptive reuse of the Cleveland Trust Tower. On June 8, the Planning Commission will hear a presentation on the tower from Cuyahoga County officials and will take public comment.

If the Cleveland City Planning Commission refuses to grant a demolition permit for the Cleveland Trust Tower, the Cuyahoga County Commissioners may be able to demolish it under a clause in Cleveland's charter that gives them the power to overrule the Planning Commission.

Also, an architecture competition titled "What Would you do with the Breuer Building?" (PDF) is being held as part of this year's Ingenuity Festival.

Architects from Davis Brody Bond, the only firm that proposed an adaptive reuse of the Cleveland Trust Tower for a new Cuyahoga County administration building, will travel to Cleveland to present their analysis to the Cleveland City Planning Commission on Friday.

(Update: Michael Gill writes about the tower in this week's Free Times.)

Removal of the historic Tinkers Creek aqueduct is underway, and should be completed in July. Cuyahoga Valley National Park officials have not obtained funding to build the planned replacement, but hope that in can be built in 2008.

The Lakewood Historical Society established a preservation fund to preserve and protect historic structures. It will first be used in an attempt to raise $30,000 to move the threatened Hall House.

The $28 million renovation of University Circle's Park Lane Villa is nearing completion (PDF), and its owners will begin leasing the first of the building's 96 luxury apartments this summer.

The Associated Press reported on the controversies surrounding the proposed demolition of the Cleveland Trust Tower in downtown Cleveland. The Cleveland City Planning Commission is scheduled to discuss the proposal on June 1 and 8.

The Coast Guard declared the east lighthouse guarding Cleveland's harbor as excess, and hopes to give it to a nonprofit (PDF) that will maintain it for education, recreation, or historic purposes. The west lighthouse is in need of repairs, and the Coast Guard wants to demolish its adjacent fog signal building. Preservationists are opposed to the demolition.

On weekends in May, members of the Midwest Railway Preservation Society will lead tours of the damaged historic B&O Roundhouse on West 3rd Street in Cleveland.

Real estate investor Sako Satka is close to completing a renovation of the historic Faerber/Morse House on Lake Avenue in Lakewood. An attempt by the home's previous owner to dismantle and auction its architectural details promted Lakewood officials to establish a waiting period for demolitions and to consider creating a landmark designation program.

The Cuyahoga County Department of Development will hold a free training session on the Ohio Historic Tax Credit program on May 8 from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Tri-C's Corporate College East. The seminar is free, but registration (PDF) is required.

The West Creek Preservation Committee and the City of Parma received a $15,000 grant from the Ohio Historical Society for the continued restoration of the historic Henninger House on Broadview Road.

Preservation Ohio released their 2007 List of Ohio's Most Endangered Historic Sites. The only Northeast Ohio structure on the list is the Cleveland Trust Tower, which the Cuyahoga County Commissioners recently voted to demolish.

Bay Village City Council and the Cahoon Park Trustees will decide whether to repair or demolish the decaying concrete trusses in the park. Estimates place the cost of repairing the historic interurban trusses at $84,000, while removing them would cost $52,000.

Heritage Ohio is accepting nominations for their Top Preservation Opportunities List (PDF), which will include "properties that have not yet been preserved—historic and architecturally-significant structures that have a good chance for survival and reuse." The submission deadline is May 6.

Sun News columnist Joe Yachanin agrees with Miller's Sam Miller's call for a unified Cuyahoga County government. Roldo Bartimole takes the opposite view and also criticizes the Plain Dealer editorial board for its stand on the Cleveland Trust Tower.

Last week, the 121-year-old street clock at 1112 Euclid Avenue in downtown Cleveland was removed and shipped to Fredericktown, Ohio after it was donated to the Fredericktown Historical Society. They plan to restore and install the clock for the Knox County village's 200th anniversary.

The Ohio Historic Preservation Office completed its review of five structures (PDF) listed for demolition by ODOT for the Innerbelt reconstruction project, and found that four of them are eligible for inclusion in the National Register for Historic Places.

The City of Strongsville received a $100,000 grant from the Ohio Cultural Facilities Commission for the restoration of Old Town Hall on Route 82. Restoration of the historic building is expected to cost in excess of $400,000.

The Paper Mill Vision Committee in Chagrin Falls supports the adaptive reuse of the former Ivex Paper Mill on Cleveland Street, and submitted four recommendations to Mayor Brick. They also suggested lowering the dam to reduce liability and remove it from ODNR's jurisdiction. The Trust for Public Land is also interested in preserving greenspace at the site.

This morning on WCPN's Sound of Ideas program, architect Robert P. Madison, incoming CUDC Director Christopher Diehl, and Plain Dealer architecture critic Steven Litt discussed the fate of the Cleveland Trust Tower. A Plain Dealer editorial says the Cuyahoga County Commissioners "made the right choice" in voting to demolish the downtown skyscraper.

The Cleveland City Planning Commission approved Cuyahoga County's request to tear down the Huron and Prospect Buildings and three pedestrian bridges at Prospect Avenue and East 9th Street, but did not vote on the proposed demolition of the adjacent Cleveland Trust Tower.

A Chagrin Falls resident created Preserve Chagrin Falls and started a petition to gauge the level of concern in the community about proposed changes to the Village's zoning code that he says could lead to a rise in mansionization and teardowns.

As expected, the Cuyahoga County Commissioners voted 2-1 today to demolish the Cleveland Trust Tower and to replace it with a new county administration building to be designed by Kohn Pederson Fox and Robert P. Madison International.

The Cleveland Chapter of the American Institute of Architects is encouraging people to attend Thursday's Cuyahoga County Board of County Commissioners meeting to urge the Commissioners to preserve and renovate the Cleveland Trust Tower.

The Ohio Department of Transportation plans to demolish at least five notable buildings in downtown Cleveland as part of their Innerbelt reconstruction project. The Ohio Historic Preservation Office is reviewing the buildings for possible inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. If the structures are deemed eligible, ODOT could still raze them if they can prove that there are no reasonable alternatives.

The Stark House, one of Garfield Heights' oldest homes, was razed to accommodate construction of the Bridgeview Crossing shopping center at Granger Road and Transportation Boulevard. The owner of the 1864 house sold it to developers for $150,000 in January.

Historic concrete trusses in Bay Village's Cahoon Park are crumbling and unsafe, and need to be repaired or demolished, says Mayor Sutherland. The trusses formerly supported an abandoned interurban railway line.

Metropolis magazine covers the likely demolition of Marcel Breuer's Cleveland Trust Tower, which would add Cleveland to the list of cities that have torn down buildings designed by the influential modernist. "Part of the problem is that while Breuer is hailed as a master, the public has not always had such a warm relationship with his work."

A group of Cleveland and Lakewood stakeholders have begun discussing the possibility of joint developments along the West 117th Street corridor. Kent State's Urban Design Center is helping to prepare a conceptual plan. Meanwhile, the fate of the former Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist on West 117th Street is again in question, because the option on the historic building held by Marous Brothers Construction will expire by the end of the month. Cleveland officials are meeting with Marous.

Steve Rugare acknowledges that the early-1970s architecture of the Cleveland Trust Tower and CSU University Center has fallen out of favor, notes that the architecture firms selected to design their replacements are known for mundane buildings, and concludes that "we shouldn't sacrifice them when mediocrity is all we're going to get in return." The Design Rag also lists several reasons for saving the tower.

The developers who purchased the Union Gospel Press building in Tremont in 2003 plan to convert the historic complex into 103 apartments. The City of Cleveland approved the restoration plans, and if the developers are able to obtain financing, the first tenants could move in 12 to 20 months after construction begins.

Lakewood officials have proposed adding preservation districts to the City's zoning code in order to preserve the character of neighborhoods. It would permit the City to implement design guidelines to "protect the integrity of the structures within the designated areas" and encourage restorations.

As local leaders prepare to demolish a pair of well-known brutalist buildings, the Plain Dealer's Steven Litt asks, "Is possible to get a fair hearing for a style nobody loves?" Cleveland State University plans to raze and replace Don Hisaka's University Center, and two of the three Cuyahoga County Commissioners favor tearing down Marcel Breuer's Ameritrust Tower in downtown Cleveland.

As part of Black History Month, Channel 3 looked at the restoration efforts for the landmark Cozad-Bates House in University Circle. Activists hope it will become an Underground Railroad education center.

Steady and visible progress has been made during the first of five years of exterior renovation to downtown Cleveland's Terminal Tower.

Preservationists are concerned that a recently sold house on Lake Avenue in Bay Village could be demolished. The demolition of one of the City's oldest homes could mark the start a teardown trend.

On Sunday, architect Jonathan Sandvick made a presentation about the potential for adaptive reuse of the closed Ivex Paper Mill in Chagrin Falls. The Village formed an ad hoc committee to study its possible reuse, and developers may be interested in rehabilitating the 147 year old building. It will discussed at a public meeting on January 29 at Chagrin Falls Township Hall, where plans for the redevelopment of the Windsor Hospital site will also be unveiled.

Last month, the Cleveland Heights Landmark Commission designated the Community of Living Hope church on Caledonia Avenue as a Cleveland Heights Landmark.

The landmark Euclid Beach Park Gateway Arch in Cleveland was seriously damaged early this morning by a hit-and-run driver.

Governor Taft signed House Bill 149, enacting the historic preservation tax credit passed by the Ohio General Assembly last month. It will go into effect in 90 days.

Cleveland City Council established the proposed University Circle Design District. City Council also enacted an emergency ordinance that alters the procedure for designating city landmarks and landmark districts. Both changes became effective on December 15.

Donovan Rypkema, the speaker at the Cleveland Restoration Society's Annual Community Luncheon, said that reusing structures is the best way to save energy and called historic preservation "the ultimate in recycling."

(Update: a transcript of the speech (PDF) is available online.)

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